Tag Archives: Wally Bock

Promotion? Not worth it…

If you’ve just spent time trying to convince people who work for you to accept a promotion,  you’ve probable got a few questions in mind.  Questions like, “Why won’t these guys take a chance?” or “Where is their drive, their motivation, their commitment?”

These may be the wrong questions.  The real question should be “Why the heck can’t I sell a promotion?”  This really translates into “What the heck is wrong with our organizational culture?”

As Wally Bock pointed out in his recent post, supervisory roles are in crisis.  Wally’s point is well founded; companies have been promoting people right up to their level of incompetence for years.  The other point he makes that resounds with me is that the younger folks amongst us are less likely to want to take on these roles if the examples they’ve seen either aren’t doing a good job or are receiving the corporate head smack at every turn.  After all, why would you want to replace the person you’ve just spent the last two years feeling sorry for?

Does your boss look like this? Want his job?

If you are a leader, have a look around at the supervisor’s working for you.  Have you created an environment that attracts good people?  Have you created an environment that makes people aspire to the jobs you’re offering?

Food for thought.

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7 Great Leadership Blogs

Now that I’ve managed to post into the double-digits, I’ve discovered that there are some blogs that I keep returning to as I wander my way around the inter-web.  These bloggers are professional leaders, mentors, coaches, and business people.  They work together to discuss leadership and communication issues and respond nicely to new bloggers like myself.  Each approaches the complex ideals of modern leadership in their own way.

Here are some of my favorites (they’re in no particular order, in fact they’re all equally excellent):

  • Wally Bock’s Three Star Leadership Blog.  Wally takes on various issues, indexes his blogs for ease of searching, and responds promptly to questions and comments.  Everyone who takes the time to comment gains additional value from his immediate and welcoming response.  Wally also uses his influence to point to other blogs with a “top five post” every week.
  • Mike Myatt’s N2 Growth Blog.  In his role as a strategic leader, Mike provides tremendous value in his posts.  In fact, his recently posted leadership test provides a great deal of food for thought.
  • Make Work Meaningful.  This collaborative site features many blog authors and serves as a one-stop shopping locale for all things leadership.  Broad topics include coaching, leadership, and organizational culture.  Not only does this group of people provide great value, they welcome the input of others.
  • Gwyn Teatro’s You’re Not the Boss of Me.  I stumbled onto Gwyn’s fantastic blog quite by accident and immediately began following her posts.  As a well-established HR professional, Gwyn has some great thoughts on leadership that I think you’ll find rewarding.  Plus her blog has a great title!
  • Commander, Submarine Group Ten.  Why the heck does this one make my list of favourites?  Well, there’s the fact that it’s a Navy blog.  How cool is that?  The real reason?  Rear-Admiral Bruner is in the process of dealing with some large organizational changes that focus on emotive issues – women in submarines chief among them.  He has a tremendous leadership challenge and is using social media to reach out and engage with his sailors.  His strong leadership shines through on his blog and is worth watching as the USN makes changes.
  • Michael Hyatt’s Leadership Blog.  Michael is the CEO of a large publishing house and provides great value through his blog.  I am not alone in my thoughts on his posts – he routinely makes it through my postrank.com filter unscathed!
  • John Baldoni’s Lead by Example Blog.   I found John’s blog through an article that he wrote for the Harvard Business Review on leadership presence.  I’ve been trying for 2o years to explain the concept of command presence to people and John’s article provided some great guidance.  Definitely worth a look.

Go ahead and let me know if you follow a leadership blog that you think I would enjoy.  I have also changed my wordpress layout and welcome comments/suggestions on the new format.  Thanks!

The Symphony Conducter Isn’t All Bad

I just read another great post by Wally Bock on leadership. In his most recent post, Wally takes aim at the management metaphor that is provided by the symphony conductor.  Wally provides a great argument against this leadership example; the conductor stands out in front, above his orchestra and exerts utter control.  To make matters worse, the conductor gets to take the full credit for the orchestra’s performance – in fact, the conductor is often the only performer to take a bow.  When you view it like that, Wally’s right; this model can’t possibly reflect the modern collaborative approach to leadership.  Or is he?

Management or leadership?

Consider the concept of the high reliability organization (HRO).  These organizations are defined by the price of failure.  They are exemplified by places like submarine control rooms, hospital emergency rooms or the flight deck of an aircraft carrier.  For these organizations the price of failure is measured not only in big money, but in lives.  The people who work in HROs, much like our orchestra, are professionals who don’t need to be told every aspect of their job.  They do, however, require someone to coordinate their activities and set the priorities – I can’t see anyone putting together an orchestra, handing out sheet music to provide the goal and then stepping back – the result would be very hard to listen to.  In other words, they need a conductor.

Let’s go over the conductor’s role again.  As the leader, he or she selects the music – or, perhaps better seen as the organization’s goal – and then sets the tempo.  Communicating using nothing but body language, the conductor coordinates the activities of a vast array of highly trained specialists.  With a gesture, he or she influences the outcome – bringing in the violins to take over the melody, initiating the flute sections’ counter-melody, reducing the volume of the percussion section so that Swan Lake can continue to awe and amaze.  As Wally points out, the conductor doesn’t wade through the orchestra pit to begin moving somebody’s fingers around the strings of a violin.  Quite the opposite – as the leader, the conductor steps up so that he or she can see and be seen.  Armed with the whole situational picture that cannot be seen by the 3rd flute, the conductor tweaks the machine to make magic.

So what is the conductor really doing?  Is he or she conducting a management activity? Nope.  When you roll in coordination, influence and communication, the conductor is coming dangerously close to exercising command.